Joshua Gregor

Joshua Gregor is International Relations Assistant at the Acton Institute. Before coming to Acton he received a BA in philosophy from the Pontifical Athenaeum Regina Apostolorum in Rome and an MA in linguistics from Indiana University.

Posts by Joshua Gregor

Charles Dickens, poverty, and emotional arguments

Why is it that the Industrial Revolution of the 19th century is so often our go-to mental paradigm for poverty? CapX’s John Ashmore, for instance, recently wrote of those who “feel an argument about poverty is incomplete without claiming we’ve somehow gone back to the 19th century.” Were there no poor people before that? Continue Reading...

Alejandro Chafuen in Forbes: Opus Dei and Jesuit priests against socialism

For most of the 20th century, Marxism set its sights on state authority and openly political and economic goals. In more recent decades, though, many proponents of Marxism and other socialist stripes have sought to sow change on a societal and cultural level – a trend which some have termed “cultural Marxism.” Two authors who not only condemned Marxism but also saw its cultural transition early on are Monsignor Fernando Ocáriz Braña, current prelate of Opus Dei, and Rev. Continue Reading...

Is there such a thing as ‘good nationalism’?

In the world of Brexit, Trump, Marine Le Pen, Viktor Orbán and all the rest, “nationalism” has become all too frequent a topic. In the 20th century the term became associated with fascism (the word “Nazi” comes from “national,” after all), but the story of nationalism goes back much farther than Nazism and isn’t nearly so one-sided a concept as it’s often made out to be. Continue Reading...

Europe’s dream

Last week, EU voters went to the polls in the latest round of the project of pan-European governance, another step on the supposed road to further unity and prosperity. The results were varied and at odds with one another, and the only constant seems to be dissatisfaction with the status quo. Continue Reading...