Joshua Gregor

Joshua Gregor is International Relations Assistant at the Acton Institute. Before coming to Acton he received a BA in philosophy from the Pontifical Athenaeum Regina Apostolorum in Rome and an MA in linguistics from Indiana University.

Posts by Joshua Gregor

Alejandro Chafuen in Forbes: State-owned enterprises and trade

Alejandro Chafuen, Acton’s Managing Director, International, published a piece in Forbes yesterday on the place of state-owned enterprises in international trade. The question also extends to industries that, even if not owned by the state, are significantly influenced by government interests, regulation, and so on. Continue Reading...

Alejandro Chafuen in Forbes: Young Europeans’ views of totalitarianism

Alejandro Chafuen, Acton’s Managing Director, International, wrote recently in Forbes to give his thoughts on a recent survey that examined young Europeans’ attitudes toward various strains of totalitarianism. Attitudes in different countries vary, of course, and – unsurprisingly – communism is viewed more favorably in countries that were never behind the Iron Curtain than in many eastern ones where the historical memory of it lives on. Continue Reading...

The Chicago Black Sox and baseball’s rule of law

Sports have already been an Acton topic in the past week, so another sports story can’t hurt: 100 years ago this month was the 1919 World Series between the Chicago White Sox and Cincinnati Reds, infamous ever since for the “Black Sox” scandal, in which eight members of the heavily favored Chicago team accepted money from gamblers to throw the series to Cincinnati. Continue Reading...

Charles Dickens, poverty, and emotional arguments

Why is it that the Industrial Revolution of the 19th century is so often our go-to mental paradigm for poverty? CapX’s John Ashmore, for instance, recently wrote of those who “feel an argument about poverty is incomplete without claiming we’ve somehow gone back to the 19th century.” Were there no poor people before that? Continue Reading...

Alejandro Chafuen in Forbes: Opus Dei and Jesuit priests against socialism

For most of the 20th century, Marxism set its sights on state authority and openly political and economic goals. In more recent decades, though, many proponents of Marxism and other socialist stripes have sought to sow change on a societal and cultural level – a trend which some have termed “cultural Marxism.” Two authors who not only condemned Marxism but also saw its cultural transition early on are Monsignor Fernando Ocáriz Braña, current prelate of Opus Dei, and Rev. Continue Reading...