A biblical theology of work, Part 2: Wealth creation

Wealth creation is a divine imperative, though one that generates significant responsibilities. The church fails on business and economics when leaders think only about the responsibilities of wealth and nothing at all about how that wealth is created – both are divine imperatives. Continue Reading...

How a Christian restauranteur navigated the pains of a pandemic

The pandemic-era lockdowns caused immeasurable pain to countless businesses, with restaurants experiencing disproportionate levels of pain and suffering. According to the National Restaurant Association, food-service industry sales “fell by $240 billion in 2020 from an expected level of $899 billion,” and by the end of 2020, “more than 110,000 eating and drinking places were closed for business temporarily, or for good.” Continue Reading...

How the Bible encourages business

When was the last time you heard a Christian talk about how godly and pious it is to earn money? I can’t remember ever hearing that in church. Christians don’t like to talk about accumulating wealth, but they do like to talk about giving money to the poor and the needy. Continue Reading...

Tobit’s biblical theology of work

Tobit is one of the lesser-known books of the Bible, in no small part because Protestant Bibles since the 19th century commonly omit it. But any Christian, Protestant or otherwise, would benefit from Tobit’s biblical theology of work. Continue Reading...

Kingdom economics: Work and trade as gift-giving

When reflecting on our economic action, we tend to be overly focused on one side of the exchange: our own benefit, our own profit, our own “piece of the pie.” Our consumer-centered culture happily affirms such an emphasis, routinely promoting a zero-sum vision of the economy and self-centered attitudes about vocation, daily work, and economic exchange. Continue Reading...