Upcoming scholarship deadline: July 15

Time is running out to apply for the Acton Institute’s Calihan Academic Grants! These awards are designed to support seminarians and graduate students in theology, philosophy, politics, economics, or related fields as they engage in serious study on the relationship between religion, liberty, theology, the free market, and the virtuous society. Continue Reading...

Athenians and Visigoths: Neil Postman’s graduation speech

While it could be argued that youth is wasted on the young, it is indisputable that commencement addresses are wasted on young graduates. Sitting in a stuffy auditorium waiting to receive a parchment that marks the beginning of one’s student loan repayments is not the most conducive atmosphere for soaking up wisdom. Continue Reading...

How people view religion’s role in their countries

Across 27 countries surveyed, more people think religion plays a less important role than a more important role compared with 20 years ago, notes a new report from Pew Research. But around the world, more people also favor an increased role for religion in their country than oppose it. Continue Reading...

Is behavioral economics blind to its blindness?

I find some of the work of behavioral economists, especially that of Daniel Kahneman to be very interesting and important. Thinking Fast and Slow is essential reading. His distinctions between what he calls Type I and Type II thinking is very insightful, and the broad critique that human beings don’t always act like rational maximizers is a correct. Continue Reading...

Alejandro Chafuen in Forbes: Think tanks and social media

Alejandro Chafuen, Acton’s Managing Director, International, writes today in Forbes with his annual analysis of think tanks’ use of social media. While social media stats shouldn’t be our only or even primary measure of success, no one can deny the prevalence of social networks in today’s world, and many groups expend considerable energy in their efforts in this field. Continue Reading...

Faith and liberty in Guatemala

To say that the history of Latin America in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries is marked by sadness and disappointment is hardly a novel insight. Whether it’s the persistence of cronyism throughout the region, the constant presence of Marxist ideology among intellectuals and in popular culture, the challenge of poverty, the crime and political violence, or the rampant populism that rears its head at regular intervals, many Latin Americans will tell you that theirs is the continent in which many things went backwards throughout the twentieth century. Continue Reading...