What we get wrong about technology

When asked to think about how new inventions might shape the future, says economist Tim Hartford, our imaginations tend to leap to technologies that are sophisticated beyond comprehension. But the reality is that most influential new technologies are often humble and cheap and new inventions do not appear in isolation: To understand how humble, cheap inventions have shaped today’s world, picture a Bible — specifically, a Gutenberg Bible from the 1450s. Continue Reading...

The awesomely boring future of driverless cars

As fears loom about a future filled with robot overlords, innovation continues to accelerate at breakneck pace. When it comes to self-driving cars, for example, tech companies are making significant strides with the technology, even as the masses continue to fret over a handful of related accidents and the potential for human abuses. Continue Reading...

StarCraft as soulcraft: Lessons from a classic computer game

The video game developer Blizzard Entertainment, best-known today for its massively popular World of Warcraft (2004), first released a lesser-known classic in 1998: StarCraft. The science fiction warfare and strategy game was the best-selling PC game of the year, and it sold nearly 10 million copies over the next decade. Continue Reading...

The ‘end’ of work

In the Q&A part of a session I led at last month’s Acton University on Abraham Kuyper and Leo XIII (based on this recent volume), I was asked about specific areas where the two figures have something concrete to contribute today. Continue Reading...

Why truly free trade is also truly fair

Throughout our political discourse, we continue to hear critiques of free trade from left and right, each of them ultimately aiming to prod us closer to an abstract notion of so-called “fair” or “fairer” trade. Continue Reading...