Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'academia'

The Various Challenges of the Higher Education Bubble

The latest topic of The City podcast is the higher education bubble, featuring Cate MacDonald, Dr. John Mark Reynolds, and Dr. Holly Ordway. Reynolds makes the point that bubbles can arise when things are overvalued, but that it is important to determine whether that thing is relatively overvalued or absolutely overvalued. Continue Reading...

The Academy’s Rage Against Capitalism

Over at Ricochet, Peter Robinson broaches the oft asked question about intellectuals and their disdain and rage against capitalism. Robinson unearthed Robert Nozick’s, “Why Do Intellectuals Oppose Capitalism?” Nozick declared, The schools, too, exhibited and thereby taught the principle of reward in accordance with (intellectual) merit. Continue Reading...

ResearchLinks – 11.02.12

Encyclopedia Entry: “Arts” Tyler Cowen. The Concise Encyclopedia of Economics. 2d ed. Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2007. General economic principles govern the arts. Most important, artists use scarce means to achieve ends—and therefore recognize trade-offs, the defining aspects of economic behavior. Continue Reading...

Sirico: The Great Lie of Socialism

Socialism, despite its deficiencies, still has its fans. “Visit the philosophy and English departments on most college campuses, and you will still find intellectuals waxing eloquent on the glories of socialist theory. Continue Reading...

Whole Life Discipleship: Integrating Faith, Economics, and Work

I’m at the “Whole Life Discipleship: Integrating Faith, Economics, and Work” conference today at Regent University. As I have the opportunity today, I’ll blog (and tweet) some of the lectures. First up is Stephen Grabill of the Acton Institute, and here are some highlights: He focused on three basic questions: What is political and economic freedom? Continue Reading...

Philosopreneurs and ‘Creative’ Destruction of Higher Ed

Even philosophers can be entrepreneurial when economic reality comes crashing in, creating an existential crisis. That’s one lesson from this intriguing Washington Post story (HT: Sarah Pulliam Bailey), “Philosophical counselors rely on eternal wisdom of great thinkers.” The actual value of philosophical counseling (or perhaps better yet, philosophical tutoring) might be debatable. Continue Reading...