Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'africa'

John Bolton unveils new Trump Administration Africa policy; Joel Salatin on how past practices harmed Africa

On December 13, National Security Advisor John Bolton delivered an address at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C. unveiling the Trump Administration’s new approach to relations with Africa. Part of the revised approach includes re-focusing US Aid efforts away from traditional government-to-government aid, and placing an increased focus on fostering private economic growth and governmental transparency. Acton has been speaking about the problems with foreign aid programs for many years; here we feature a portion of an interview conducted in 2011 with author, commentator and farmer Joel Salatin, who shares how African farmers complained to him about the clear negative impacts of US aid programs on local productive capacity in their home countries. You can find more on how to alleviate global poverty and spur human flourishing at PovertyCure. Continue Reading...

Africa needs trade, not more weapons

The EU is considering a $12-billion peace plan that would supply weapons to war-torn western and central Africa, known as the Sahel region. But Ibrahim Anoba – who hails from Lagos, Nigeria – says trade and economic development, including lower EU tariffs, would go a long way toward bringing peace to the area. Continue Reading...

Africans Fight Media Stereotypes

We’ve all seen the pictures: a little African boy wearing nothing but an dirty, over-sized t-shirt emblazoned with the logo of a U.S. sports team, or a little African girl, dressed in rags and pitifully surrounded by flies. Continue Reading...

#BringBackOurBoys Too

Boko Haram, the militant Islamist group in Nigeria, is infamous for kidnapping girls. Last year, everyone from Wall Street to Hollywood got in on the [ineffective] #BringBackOurGirls social media campaign after Boko Haram kidnapped dozens of Christian school girls. Continue Reading...

Wasting Away In Refugee Camps

A refugee camp, by definition, is meant to be temporary. Yet, in many places in Africa, young people know nothing but life in a refugee camp. And they are wasting away – perhaps not physically, but mentally, emotionally and in terms of feeling useful. Continue Reading...