Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'human flourishing'

Racelessness is the future of justice

What if the answer to racial tensions in America lay in the removal of race as a necessary identifier of any human person? This question frames a new theory put forward by Sheena Mason, assistant professor of African American literature at SUNY Oneonta, in Oneonta, N.Y. Continue Reading...

Does Hollywood love beauty more than profit?

Beauty has the power to spellbind everyone—the proof is Canadian director Denis Villeneuve. His last three movies, Dune (2021), Blade Runner 2049 (2017), and Arrival (2016), have earned him a reputation as a visionary and a sensitive director, despite science fiction as his genre, which normally is considered either too sophisticated for the broad audience to follow or too simplistic to be worth attention, instantly forgotten. Continue Reading...

The fallacy of capitalism’s ‘race to the bottom’

The Biden administration proposes a global minimum tax on corporations to end the “global race to the bottom.” Leaving aside the wisdom of letting France tax U.S.-based corporations, this phrase recalls one of the regnant canards of our time: Capitalism inevitably lowers living standards and grinds people down into poverty. Continue Reading...

Economic freedom means longer life, lower infant mortality, and less poverty: Report

Economic freedom is strongly tied to human flourishing, longevity, and even rates of survival, according to a new study. The Fraser Institute released its 2020 “Economic Freedom of the World” report on Thursday and, once again, the Canadian think tank found a strong correlation between free-market economics, prosperity, and overall levels of public health and well-being. Continue Reading...

How to learn new skills in a challenging economy

People all around the world have embraced new responsibilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. Some continue to work providing needed goods and services, while others are discovering new ways their work can meet those needs while they are physically distant from their colleagues and those whom they serve. Continue Reading...