Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'violence'

Education And Mental Health: Will Assessments Stop School Shootings?

that would require homeschooled and public school students to undergo mandatory mental health assessments. The bill aims to “provide behavioral health assessments to children” and states the following: “That section 10-206 of the general statutes be amended to require (1) each pupil enrolled in public school at grades 6, 8, 10 and 12 and each home-schooled child at ages 12, 14 and 17 to have a confidential behavioral health assessment, the results of which shall be disclosed only to the child’s parent or guardian, and (2) each health care provider performing a child’s behavioral health assessment to complete the appropriate form supplied by the State Board of Education verifying that the child has received the assessment.” Continue Reading...

Humor and Prison Rape Culture

Yesterday I noted some items related to the question of punishment and restorative justice in the American criminal justice system. And in the past we’ve looked here at the PowerBlog of the issues surrounding political and social activism on prison rape. Continue Reading...

Two Words of Praise and One of Caution

I’ve been on record more than once regarding my own doubts and criticisms of the precise political pronouncements made by various church groups, especially offices and branches seemingly representing the institutional church. Continue Reading...

Immigration Rally Gone Awry

The nation’s news outlets picked up the story quickly last week out of downtown Los Angeles, where an immigration rally at MacArthur Park sparked a violent police reaction. The LAPD police chief, William J. Continue Reading...

Virginia Tech Shooting Reveals America’s New ‘At Risk’ Group

Anthony Bradley looks at America’s children of privilege and the influences that have put so many of them into crisis. “There is mounting evidence that we are faced with a new reality in America: educated, middle-class kids represent a new ‘at risk’ group, as both perpetrators and victims of peer-related violence,” Bradley writes. Continue Reading...