Latest Posts

The Abject Failure of the U.N.

The idealism and the goals of the United Nations are laudable. The results, at least in recent years, have often been nothing short of a disaster. One example will suffice—the recently created U.N.’s Continue Reading...

Immigration and Xenophobia

I’m reading David Schmidtz’s Elements of Justice, which is very ably reviewed (although not by me) in the forthcoming issue of the Journal of Markets & Morality (10.1). I just read a striking passage, which discusses the merits of a principle of property rights that respects first possession rather than equal shares. Continue Reading...

Medical Malpractice and Abortion

I thought this was an interesting bit at the intersection of morality and economics. An insurance brokerage firm, K&B Underwriters, is sponsoring a physicians’ survey designed to determine whether doctors who work within a “culture of life” framework (e.g., Continue Reading...

More Audio from Acton University

This post will be updated and bumped as more audio becomes available. Newer audio appears at the bottom of the list. Economic Liberty in Catholic Social Teaching: Kishore Jayabalan Competing Visions of Business: Michael Miller Sixteenth-Century Protestant Moral Theologians: Stephen Grabill Catholic Social Teaching: Basic Principles: Stephen HaesslerNOTE: This is a re-post; the audio link from a previous post has been corrected. Continue Reading...

Praying at the Pump

Do you consider gasoline to be a gift from God? You should. Andy Crouch, editorial director of the Christian Vision Project at Christianity Today, writes in a recent Books & Culture piece, “As our family sits together, eyes closed, we say grace. Continue Reading...

Subsidies at Home, Suffering Abroad

In today’s NYT: “Oxfam Suggests Benefit in Africa if U.S. Cuts Cotton Subsidies.” “Eliminating billions of dollars in federal subsidies to American cotton growers each year would reduce American cotton production and exports, raise world prices by about 10 percent and modestly improve the incomes of millions of poor cotton farmers in Africa, according to a new study by Oxfam, the aid group.” Continue Reading...

National Security and Global Warming

On today’s Diane Rehm Show, a panel of experts discussed the pending energy policy legislation in the US Congress. Karen Wayland, legislative director of the Natural Resources Defense Counsel talked about the need to join the concepts of national security and climate change when discussing energy policy (RealAudio). Continue Reading...

Goodbye, World Bank?

As developing countries turn increasingly to private capital markets, the World Bank is facing not only a steep decline in demand for its loans but a crisis of relevancy. Sam Gregg looks at the changing market and how the rules of private lending might also provide a better check on corruption in the developing world. Continue Reading...