Who’s an Old Whig?

July 10, 2019 • by Samuel Gregg

Who’s an Old Whig?

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PowerLinks 07.10.19

Adam Smith’s Refreshing Idea of Justice Vernon Smith, Wall Street Journal His definition attempts to minimize harm while maximizing freedom. Religious freedom is basis of all other freedoms in U.S., cardinal says Marie Mischel, Catholic News Service The nation’s Bill of Rights guaranteed freedom of religion, not freedom from religion, New York Cardinal Timothy M. Continue Reading...

How fiscal policy can lead to ‘crowding out’

Note: This is post #128 in a weekly video series on basic economics. Effective fiscal policy has to be timely, targeted, and temporary. But how the central bank, businesses, and consumers respond to fiscal policy also plays a role in how effective it is, says economist Alex Tabarrok. Continue Reading...

Greece: The end of austerity populism?

On Monday, the leadership of the anti-austerity populism passed definitively to Matteo Salvini of Italy, as Kyriakos Mitsotakis was sworn in as the prime minister of Greece. Mitsotakis, the son of former Prime Minister Konstantinos Mitsotakis, displaced Alexis Tsipras of the left-wing ruling party, Syriza (literally “the Coalition of the Left”), on a platform of lower taxes, deregulation, and unleashing the free market. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 07.09.19

Why Pastors Should Engage Abraham Kuyper William Edgar, Credo Three realms where Kuyper’s burdens ought to challenge the contemporary pastor are the church, education, and politics. What Is True Liberty? Gene Edward Veith, Ligonier Ministries Today many of us assume that freedom means getting to do whatever we want. Continue Reading...

James Wilson Institute interviews Samuel Gregg about new book

The James Wilson Institute’s Deputy Director Garrett Snedeker and intern Jake Rinear recently conducted an interview with Samuel Gregg, director of research at the Acton Institute, about his new book “Reason, Faith, and the Struggle for Western Civilization.” Gregg answered questions pertaining to a variety of topics such as religious liberty, freedom, natural law, enlightenment ideas, the reintegration of faith and reason and others, many of which Gregg expands upon in his book. Continue Reading...