Latest Posts

As Expected, Jobless Claims ‘Unexpectedly’ Increase

Today at Bloomberg we find this unexpected news about unemployment: Applications for U.S. unemployment benefits unexpectedly climbed to a nine-week high, underscoring the difficulty adjusting the data for seasonal variations such as the Easter holiday and spring recess at schools. Continue Reading...

In Praise of Trade Schools

One of the benefits of a Christian theology of work is that it frees parents up to encourage their children to pursue various employment-related vocations that cultivate creation, rather than prod them to waste a life in the unfulfilling pursuit of the American Dream. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 04.01.14

Global Poverty Is on the Decline, But Almost No One Believes It Barna Group Did you know that, in the past 30 years, the percentage of people in the world who live in extreme poverty has decreased by more than half? Continue Reading...

C.S. Lewis on the Progressive’s Regress

Over at Christianity Today Art Lindsley has a good piece on how C.S. Lewis’s support for true progress led him to oppose Progressivism: Some of Lewis’s most pointed criticisms of “progress” came when he wrote on economics and politics, even though he did not often comment on these topics. Continue Reading...

Inequality and the Hunger Games

When does inequality become unjust? In this week’s Acton Commentary, Jordan Ballor considers that question in the context of Pope Francis’s teachings and Suzanne Collins’ Hunger Games trilogy: Earlier this week, Pope Francis logged onto his @Pontifex Twitter account to declare that “inequality is the root of social evil.” This was of a piece with his November apostolic exhortation, “Evangelii Gaudium,” in which he asserted that “inequality is the root of social ills.” Within the deeper context of his exhortation, it is evident that Francis is not advocating for equality in an absolute sense. Continue Reading...

If You Love Babies You Should Love Economic Growth

Today you’ll be hearing a lot about this latest bit of bad —really, really bad —economic news: Real gross domestic product — the output of goods and services produced by labor and property located in the United States — increased at an annual rate of 0.1 percent in the first quarter (that is, from the fourth quarter of 2013 to the first quarter of 2014), according to the “advance” estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Continue Reading...