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Dalio’s animated adventure in common grace-infused wisdom

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Ray Dalio is a fascinating character. Founder of the “world’s richest and strangest hedge fund,” he’s been dubbed the “Steve Jobs of investing” and “Wall Street’s oddest duck.” He’s currently #26 on Forbes list of richest people in America and Time magazine once included him on their list of the world’s 100 most influential people.

In 2011, Dalio outlined his personal philosophy on life and business in a self-published 123-page PDF called “Principles.” (It was re-released as a book in 2017 and become the #1 Amazon business book of the year.)

Dalio isn’t a Christian, and doesn’t seem to have much interest in religion (although he practices a form of secularized Transcendental Mediation). But many of his principles exhibit a type of common grace-infused wisdom that can be value to Christians.

Recently, Dalio released an animated version of his book—”An ultra mini-series adventure in 30 minutes in 8 episodes.” Instead of reading the PDF or book you can glean most of the valuable lessons in 30 minutes (or 15 minutes if you watch at 2x speed). You can watch all of the videos below.

“The Call to Adventure” | Episode 1

“Embrace Reality and Deal With It” | Episode 2

The Five Step Process” | Episode 3

“The Abyss” | Episode 4

Everything is a Machine” | Episode 5

“Your Two Biggest Barriers” | Episode 6

“Be Radically Open-Minded” | Episode 7

“Struggle Well” | Episode 8

 

See also: Dalio’s “How the Economic Machine Works”

 

 

 

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Joe Carter Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

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