Blog author: jballor
Monday, September 19, 2005
By

Government is the only arena in which I can readily see that incompetence and failure, often of the staggeringly ignominious variety, is “punished” with an increase of funding and influence. Many others have observed this phenomena, perhaps most pervasive in the public education system. As we all know, the problem is always a lack of funds.

But we find the same twisted logic at work following the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The inadequacy of government at all levels, with most of the focus on the federal, is not leading some to the obvious criticism of the size, complexity, and bureaucracy of government. Instead, we are seeing the contrary call, to increase the size of the government. As Anne Applebaum writes in The Washington Post, a number of figures, including German chancellor Gerhard Schrr, see the problem as too little government, not too much.

Applebaum rightly takes this statist interpretation of events to task, as she writes of the pervasiveness and effectiveness of relief efforts by elements of civil society. While “it is true that the worst failures of the past two weeks have been big government failures,” she observes, “The biggest successes, by contrast, have come out of this country’s incredibly vibrant, amazingly diverse and fantastically generous civil society. Sooner or later, it will be impossible not to draw political lessons from that paradox.”

The political lesson should not be that more government is the answer, but rather a more focused and efficient government. The increase in government should be qualitative, not quantitative. It remains to be seen which will prevail: the axiomatic big government logic (perhaps manifested in an increased FEMA budget!), or common-sense conclusions about the scope and necessary limits of government power.


  • http://www.archchicago.org Anon

    Re:
    “Government is the only arena ………” unfortunately is not inclusive enough. How about the Roman Catholic Hierarchy sending Cardinal Bernard Law to the Curia? Cardinal Levada becoming prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith? Archbishop Weakland becoming a priest (let alone a Archbishop) alone?

    There is a huge task in breaking the cycle of promoting the incompetent.

    Anon

  • http://blog.acton.org Jordan

    Anon,

    Not being Roman myself, I’ll have to plead ignorance…the workings of the hierarchy are not “readily” visible to me.