Acton Institute Powerblog

Free Trade is Simple

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Hans Mahncke, an International Law and Trade scholar at Hong Kong’s Lion Rock Institute, takes to task recalcitrant NGOs in a recent TCS article. The essential sticking point is the inability to reform the WTO:

The WTO is plagued by two major faults. On the one hand, its rules have grown too complex, feature too many loopholes and allow for too much discretion on the part of those who actually understand them. On the other hand, if countries with greater negotiating clout cannot find a way to wiggle their way out of WTO commitments within the framework of multilateral rules, they simply circumvent these by entering into bilateral arrangements. Hence, assuming that NGOs are focused on a return to multilateralism, they ought to start investing their time and energy to lobby for fewer rules, rather than more.

This makes the point beautifully: the more complex and regulatory trade agreements are, the more likely they are to not be free. As Mahncke asks, “Ultimately, if someone, anywhere, wants to buy someone else’s goods or services at a mutually agreeable price, why should government, or NGOs, interfere with such an arrangement?” Good question.

Jordan J. Ballor Jordan J. Ballor (Dr. theol., University of Zurich; Ph.D., Calvin Theological Seminary) is a senior research fellow and director of publishing at the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, where he also serves as executive editor the Journal of Markets & Morality. He is author of Get Your Hands Dirty: Essays on Christian Social Thought (and Action) (Wipf & Stock, 2013), Covenant, Causality, and Law: A Study in the Theology of Wolfgang Musculus (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2012) and Ecumenical Babel: Confusing Economic Ideology and the Church's Social Witness (Christian's Library Press, 2010), as well as editor of numerous works, including Abraham Kuyper Collected Works in Public Theology. Jordan is also associate director of the Junius Institute for Digital Reformation Research at Calvin Theological Seminary. He has authored articles in academic publications such as The Journal of Religion, Scottish Journal of Theology, Reformation & Renaissance Review, and Journal of Scholarly Publishing, and has written popular pieces for newspapers including the Detroit News, Orange County Register, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In 2006, Jordan was profiled in the book, The Relevant Nation: 50 Activists, Artists And Innovators Who Are Changing The World Through Faith. Jordan's scholarly interests include Reformation studies, church-state relations, theological anthropology, social ethics, theology and economics, and research methodology. Jordan is a member of the Christian Reformed Church in North America (CRCNA), and he resides in Jenison, Michigan with his wife and three children.

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