first-they-cameMitchell Baker, executive chair of Mozilla, announced on the company’s blog that Brendan Eich, former Mozilla CEO has stepped down “for Mozilla and our community.” His sin: contributing $1000 in 2008 in support of California’s Prop 8, which upheld traditional marriage.

Now, Mozilla is a company that takes great pride in their – ahem – tolerance and open-mindedness. Really.

Mozilla believes both in equality and freedom of speech. Equality is necessary for meaningful speech. And you need free speech to fight for equality. Figuring out how to stand for both at the same time can be hard.

Our organizational culture reflects diversity and inclusiveness. We welcome contributions from everyone regardless of age, culture, ethnicity, gender, gender-identity, language, race, sexual orientation, geographical location and religious views. Mozilla supports equality for all.


Yet it’s clear that something in the corporate climate of Mozilla made it impossible for Eich to continue in his job. And that something is bigotry, plain and simple. Here is Robert P. George:

Mozilla has now made its employment policy clear.

No Catholics need apply.

Or Evangelical Christians.

Or Eastern Orthodox.

Or Orthodox Jews.

Or Mormons.

Or Muslims.

Unless, that is, you are the “right kind” of Catholic, Evangelical, Eastern Orthodox Christian, observant Jew, Mormon, or Muslim, namely, the kind who believes your religious or philosophical tradition is wrong about the nature of marriage as the conjugal union of husband and wife, and the view now dominant among secular elites is correct. In that case, Mozilla will consider you morally worthy to work for them. Or maybe you can work for them even if you do happen to believe (or should I say “believe”) your faith’s teaching—so long as you keep your mouth shut about it: “Don’t ask, don’t tell.”

Once Eich’s contribution was made known, it took Mozilla only a week to toss him, “Eich’s head as a trophy on their wall.”

Back on the Mozilla blog, Mitchell says, “While painful, the events of the last week show exactly why we need the web. So all of us can engage freely in the tough conversations we need to make the world better,” yet comments are closed. It’s tough to engage freely in conversation when you can’t talk.

Mozilla has made it clear: all are welcome, so long as they agree with us. Bigotry and bullying have become their new corporate principles.

Read “What Mozilla Means” at First Things.

Clash Of Orthodoxies: Law Religion & Morality In Crisis

Clash Of Orthodoxies: Law Religion & Morality In Crisis

George argues that on controversial issues, traditional Judeo-Christian beliefs are actually rationally superior to secular liberal alternatives.


  • AndrewWS

    Now is the time for all of us to uninstall our Mozilla products and let the company know why.

    • K Hill

      Exactly. I was hesitating to uninstall Firefox on my Linux computer, and keeping it just for Eich’s sake. But to keep it now would be only to keep a product of hate-mongers. I’m using Opera, which for all I know is run by a bunch of homosexual activists, but at least they haven’t fired someone just for disagreeing with them about it. I’ll keep my Thunderbird email. They are not working on it anymore, it’s life cycle has ended. So they won’t be hearing from me again.