After Elliot Rodger decided to take out his rage on innocent people in California, the web went crazy with vitriol. Rodger had mentioned in his homemade video and his writings that he was angry at women, couldn’t get a date, etc. Despite the fact that the majority of his victims were male, the #YesAllWomen tag went viral. It was meant to denote that all women suffer from abuse and violence.

But is this really the case? Thankfully, Christina Hoff Sommers from the American Enterprise Institute does a great job on setting the record straight. She reminds us that this is too important an issue to get the facts wrong.








  • Dan

    Christina,

    Great responses. I agree with you. I think it is the case that the use of exaggerated and distorted statistics are a growing problem in our society and few people seem to recognize it or call it deceptive as you have. Thank you. One other point on equal pay. I worked for 28 years as an engineer at Boeing and it seemed to me that, far from wage discrimination, women engineers were rated higher and promoted more often than they would have been had they been men. I even had a “feminist” university professor in electrical engineering who joined our research group during her year’s sabbatical tell me that she wouldn’t have gotten her PhD from Berkeley had she been a man.

    I have one issue that I think you should speak to, which was addressed in a book some years ago by Brian Mitchell: Weak Link: The Feminization of the American Military.

    Thanks for your clear thinking and articulation of these issues.

    Dan