Rev. Gregory Jensen

The Rev. Gregory Jensen is a psychologist of religion and a priest of the Archdiocese of Washington, D.C. (Orthodox Church in America). He also blogs at Koinonia and The American Orthodox Institute. Fr. Gregory was a Lone Mountain Fellow with the Bozeman, Mont.-based Property and Environmental Research Center (PERC) during the summer of 2013.

Posts by Rev. Gregory Jensen

Canons and Guns: An Eastern Orthodox Response to a HuffPo Writer

Several of my friends on Facebook pages posted a link to David Dunn’s Huffington Post essay on gun control (An Eastern Orthodox Case for Banning Assault Weapons). As Dylan Pahman posted earlier today, Dunn, an Eastern Orthodox Christian, is to be commended for bringing the tradition of the Orthodox Church into conversation with contemporary issues such as gun control. Continue Reading...

Review: AEI’s Common Sense Concept Series

Over the last several years I find myself more and more being drawn into conversation about religion—specifically, Orthodox Christianity—and economics. Originally, my interest in the economic side of the conversation was minimal. Continue Reading...

Debt, Credit and the Virtuous Life

This week’s Acton Commentary: Our economic life is concerned with more than just the objective exchange of goods and services. Far from being morally neutral, it is an expression of how we understand our dependence on God and neighbor and is the means by which we fulfill, or not, our obligations toward them. Continue Reading...

The Perils of Obedience

On his blog, Marginal Revolution, Tyler Cowan links to an article about game show, The Game Of Death, that was recently broadcast on French television. According to the article (“Torture ‘Game Show’ Draws Nazi Comparison“) the program, “had all the trappings of a traditional television quiz show, with a roaring crowd and a glamorous and well-known hostess.” For all that it appeared to be a typical game show, what “contestants . Continue Reading...

Review: An Orthodox Christian Natural Law Witness

Like many, my first encounter with Orthodox theology was intoxicating. Here, finally, in the works of thinkers such as Vladimir Lossky, John Meyendorf and Alexander Schmemann and others I found an intellectually rigorous approach to theology that was biblical and patristic in its sources, mystical in its orientation and beautiful in its language. Continue Reading...