Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Posts by Joe Carter

5 Facts about Michael Novak

The theologian, scholar, and writer Michael Novak died yesterday at the age of 83. Novak was one of the most influential Catholic thinkers of his generation, and an indefatigable champion of free enterprise, democracy, and liberty. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 02.17.17

The Catholic Schools Saved by Vouchers Laura McKenna, The Atlantic Parishes staved off closures by participating in a school-choice program, but that also resulted in fewer donations to the church. Say’s Law: The Antidote to Countless Economic Fallacies Russell Lamberti, Mises Wire To understand the principle that has been called Say’s Law, it is useful to start by thinking about what unhampered exchange is: the mutual offering of goods and services between people. Continue Reading...

Understanding the President’s Cabinet: Labor Secretary

UPDATE: Andy Puzder withdrew his name from consideration yesterday, so we’re updating and reposting this article with the information for the new nominee, Alexander Acosta. Note: This is the fifth in a weekly series of explanatory posts on the officials and agencies included in the President’s Cabinet. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 02.16.17

Subsidiarity and Trump’s Cabinet Andy Smarick, Opportunity Lives We might hope that the president’s preference for successful private-sector leaders would lead to non-technocratic policy-making. But Trump appears to have little aversion to a robust federal government, so long as he controls it. Continue Reading...

Lord Acton’s judgment on pope and king

“Acton’s ideal of the historian as judge, as the upholder of the moral standard, is the most noble ideal ever proposed for the historian,” says Josef L. Altholz in this week’s Acton Commentary, “and it is an ideal that has been rejected, perhaps with grudging respect, by all historians, including myself.” We workaday historians can have no higher ideal than Acton’s second choice, impartiality or objectivity. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 02.15.17

Does Religion Have a Place in Public Schools? Benjamin Justice and Colin Macleod, The Atlantic “The question of what to do with religion in school-choice programs is how, or whether, to keep the baby while ditching the bathwater.” Lawmakers and Regulators Act Like They Hate Farmers Markets Baylen Linnekin , Reason.com Is the purist or the modern vision of a farmers market the proper one? Continue Reading...

5 Facts about Frederick Douglass

February 14 is the chosen birthday of Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), one of America’s greatest champions of individual liberty. Here are five facts you should know about this writer, orator, statesman, and abolitionist: Portrait of Frederick Douglass / Public domain 1. Continue Reading...

When Nixon tried to control prices

Note: This is post #21 in a weekly video series on basic microeconomics. President Nixon had a problem—inflation was out of control. So in 1971 he attempted to implement a drastic solution: he declared price increases illegal. Continue Reading...