Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Posts by Joe Carter

PowerLinks 08.18.17

Passions’ Republic David Bradshaw, Touchstone The Christian cure for what ails modern politics. Why Making a Profit Is Good Citizenship Anne Bradley, Institute for Faith, Work, and Economics The burden of maintaining freedom lies with those benefiting from the prosperity stemming from it. Continue Reading...
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PowerLinks 08.17.17

Corporations Becoming New Arbiters Of Public Morality Peter Hasson, Daily Caller Major corporations are increasingly expected to play a societal role beyond just providing goods or services: more and more often, they’re expected to weigh in on issues of public morality. Continue Reading...
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On modern economics and the reading of old books

I was living with thousands of Marines on a base in Japan when I discovered a novel about a handful of Classics students living at a small, elite Vermont college. Donna Tartt’s The Secret History instantly became on of my favorite books, partially because at the time (1993) I was dreaming of leaving the Corps and attending St. Continue Reading...

We are getting income inequality wrong – and that’s dangerous

People tend to be poor because they are excluded from market exchange, says Anne Rathbone Bradley in this week’s Acton Commentary. Wealth redistribution doesn’t change that but reforming cronyism does. What we need to ensure is that financial capital doesn’t become equivalent to political power for corporations. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 08.16.17

The Onerous, Arbitrary, Unaccountable World of Occupational Licensing Michelle Cottle, The Atlantic Like its predecessor, the Trump administration wants to reform how states issue these certificates, which often have less to do with consumer protection than economic protectionism. Continue Reading...

Entry, exit, and supply curves: Constant costs

Note: This is post #45 in a weekly video series on basic microeconomics. Industries that have a flat supply curve are called “constant cost” industries. An example is domain name registration: to increase the supply of domain names, we must only increase the inputs by a negligible amount. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 08.15.17

Reason, Faith, and the Struggle for Western Civilization Samuel Gregg, Public Discourse Any defense of the West must be clear about those core commitments to reason and the reasonable God that are central to its identity. Continue Reading...
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5 Facts about the alt-right

A rally held in Charlottesville, Virginia this weekend ended in violence and domestic terrorism, as white nationalist groups clashed with counter-protestors. The Unite the Right rally was intended, as co-promoter Matthew Heimbach explains, to unite the alt-right around the “14 words”: “We must secure the existence of our people and the future for white children’—as our primary motivating factor.” The objectives of the alt-right movement are antithetical to the mission, values, and principles of the Acton Institute and other like-minded groups. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 08.14.17

Are Christians Callous Toward The Poor For Thinking Effort Matters? Jessica Burke, The Federalist Are Christians Callous Toward The Poor For Thinking Effort Matters? A new poll suggests some evangelical Christians see poverty as the result of laziness, not due to circumstances. Continue Reading...
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