Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Posts by Joe Carter

PowerLinks 10.13.16

How to understand the three A’s of religious liberty as Christians Andrew T. Walker, ERLC Everyone worships something (adoration); everyone wants to live truthfully (authentically); and everyone has an ultimate standard for what they value (authority). Continue Reading...

Leaked emails reveal Clinton camp mocked Catholics

Have you ever wondered what liberal political activists and politicians think of Catholics? Well, thanks to Wikileaks you can get a glimpse into their views. In a couple of emails from Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta’s account there are exchanges in which conservative Catholics are mocked. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 10.12.16

Aristotle on Economics and the Flourishing Life Harvey C. Mansfield, Modern economics makes its way without study of the “flourishing life,” which is one translation of what Aristotle meant by happiness. Continue Reading...

How to read a demand curve

Note: This is the fifth post in a weekly video series on basic microeconomics. In a previous post we looked at how to understand the demand curve. In this video, we take a closer look by examining how to read the demand curve, how demand curves shift, and consumer surplus. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 10.11.16

We Abandon Social Conservatism at Our Own Peril Carlos D. Flores, Public Discourse Fiscal conservativism cannot exist without social conservatism. Strong families form the foundation of healthy societies and strong economies. Continue Reading...

The moral consequences of economic growth

In 1820, America’s per capita income averaged $1,980, in today’s dollars. But by 2000, it had increased to $43,000. That economic growth has benefited the rich, of course. But it has also transformed the lives of the poor—and prevented many more from becoming or staying poor. Continue Reading...