Joe Carter

Joe Carter is a Senior Editor at the Acton Institute. Joe also serves as an editor at the The Gospel Coalition, a communications specialist for the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and as an adjunct professor of journalism at Patrick Henry College. He is the editor of the NIV Lifehacks Bible and co-author of How to Argue like Jesus: Learning Persuasion from History's Greatest Communicator (Crossway).

Posts by Joe Carter

Martin Scorsese’s Silence: Christianity’s crucible in Japan

In the coming weeks, a film speculated by many to be Martin Scorsese’s most personal and poignant project to date will release throughout the United States. “While Silence depicts a Japan deeply resistant to Christian influence,” says Ken Marotte in this week’s Acton Commentary, “the story actually begins approximately 100 years earlier, when Christianity was not only tolerated, but encouraged.” The Christian faith reached Japan’s shores in 1549, when Francis Xavier, co-founder of the Jesuit order and one of the church’s most prolific missionaries, made landfall. Continue Reading...

5 Facts about international human rights

Last week President Obama proclaimed December 10, 2016, as Human Rights Day and the week beginning December 10, 2016, as Human Rights Week, an annual observance to commemorate the day on which, in 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 12.14.16

Preserving Limited Government In Difficult Times Pete Spiliakos, First Things The concerns of conventional economic conservatives are sound but insufficient. All else being equal, lower taxes and regulation will be better for growth. Continue Reading...

ATMs, bank tellers, and the automation paradox

In September 1969 the Chemical Bank branch in Rockville Center, New York opened the first automatic teller machines. The first ATM was only able to give out cash, but by 1971 the machine could handle multiple functions, including providing customers’ account balances. Continue Reading...

What you should know about subsidies

Note: This is post #13 in a weekly video series on basic microeconomics. What is a subsidy? A subsidy is really just a negative or reverse tax, explains Alex Tabarrok. Instead of collecting money in the form of a tax, the government gives money to consumer or producers. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 12.13.16

To Help The Poorest Of The Poor, First You Have To Find Them Mark H. Kim, NPR In the quest to help the poor, it’s difficult to know whose needs are the greatest. Continue Reading...

The cost of Twelve Days of Christmas: $34,363.49

If you’ve been stuck at the mall listening to a song about ten Lords a-Leaping and eight Maids a-Milking you can blame the Jesuits. Rumor has it they invented the Twelve Days of Christmas song as a catechism in code for persecuted Catholics in 16th-century England. Continue Reading...

PowerLinks 12.12.16

Trump the Progressive Kevin D. Williamson, National Review Progressivism is not a set of cultural inclinations but a body of public-policy views. Bread for the World says global hunger can end by 2030 Matt Hadro, Catholic News Agency Bread for the World believes that world hunger can be eliminated by 2030, but insists it will happen only if the United States and other major global powers train their resources on the difficulties afflicting “fragile states” around the world. Continue Reading...

An ecumenical Methodist: Thomas Oden (1931–2016)

Thomas Oden, considered by many to be one of the premier Methodist theologians in America, died yesterday at the age of 85. Oden was the author of numerous theological works, including the three-volume systematic theology The Word of Life, Life in the Spirit, and The Living God. Continue Reading...