New York City ideologues get indigestion over Chick-fil-A

America’s fastest-growing food chain has come to New York City. But as Hunter Baker notes in this week’s Acton Commentary, the “company’s success sticks in the craw of some who find it to be an alien presence due to the Christianity of the family who owns the company and their traditional values.” A recent New Yorker piece refers to the Chick-fil-A expansion as a “creepy infiltration” of the city. Continue Reading...

Cronyism fueled the murder of a Slovak journalist

“Slovakia has been living through one of the most turbulent times in its young history,” says Martina Bobulová in this week’s Acton Commentary. “It has been almost a month since the murder of investigative journalist Ján Kuciak and his fiancée, Martina Kušnírová, which have put these events in motion.” Much has changed in past four weeks – the nation went to the streets and the country experienced the biggest public protests since the Velvet Revolution in 1989. Continue Reading...

Marxism, the classless society and history

“Marx always insisted that he derived his system from a careful study of history,” says Lester Dekoster in this week’s Acton Commentary. “Marxists are fond of insisting that they think ‘concretely,’ which means they always stick to the facts. Continue Reading...

Taxation and Catholic Social Teaching

“Tax policies and tax levies are an unavoidable part of civilized life,” says Robert G. Kennedy in this week’s Acton Commentary. “The social tradition of the Church emphasizes the duty of citizens to support their government as well as the duties of civil authorities to govern wisely and to respect the ownership rights of individuals and families.” Kennedy outlines five things the tradition Catholic social teaching teaches us about taxation and four things it does not. Continue Reading...

West silent as genocide lurks in Syria

“This month marks the seventh anniversary of the start of the Syrian Civil War,” notes Trey Dimsdale in this week’s Acton Commentary. “Syria was, albeit governed by dictator Bashar al-Assad, a stable nation but today it is in ruins, with so many fault lines and battlefields that it is nearly impossible to sort out the contending interests inside the nation. Continue Reading...

The long road back from Communism

“In 1989, Communism finally collapsed,” writes Mihail Neamţu, a Romanian thinker and public intellectual, in this week’s Acton Commentary. “On our first official post-communist Christmas holiday, my family was hoping that the political landscape of Eastern Europe would quickly be shaped by healthy democratic institutions, secure private property and free trade, economic competition, as well as a robust sense of personal responsibility.” Nearly 20 years later, the anticipated reforms have been abandoned, the economy sputters, and Romanian society remains stubbornly statist: State monopolies still govern the transportation, healthcare, energy, and education sectors. Continue Reading...

After apartheid, South Africa veers toward vengeance

“South Africa’s institutionalized national sin of radical and often violent racial segregation, officially known as Apartheid, ended in the early 1990s. Changes in law, however, do not necessarily mean that there is immediate social transformation,” says Trey Dimsdale in this week’s Acton Commentary. Continue Reading...

Black Panther has something important to offer

In this week’s Acton Commentary I examine the dynamics of marginalization and solidarity in the blockbuster phenomenon Black Panther. As so many commentators have suggested, there’s a lot to this film, and one of the important things it has to offer is a valuable perspective on the underlying unity amidst diversity in humanity. Continue Reading...

Can capitalism be saved from conservatives?

“The diversity of American conservatism would astound those pundits, politicians, and critics who believe conservatism is a rigid ideology aimed at privileging the wealthy (and the white),” says Gregory L. Schneider in this week’s Acton Commentary. Continue Reading...

Catholic bishops against Mark Janus

“On February 26 the US Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Janus v. American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME),” says Charles W. Baird in this week’s Acton Commentary. Continue Reading...