What is ‘economic man’?

“Intellectuals are often vocal critics of capitalism. Most of them lean left politically, so it is easy to identify anti-capitalism with progressivism,” says Kishore Jayabalan in this week’s Acton Commentary. “It is therefore no coincidence that the modern welfare state has been administered by elites eager to correct supposed market failures on the way to a more egalitarian society. Continue Reading...

Upstream: A Conversation on Artist Renee Radell

On the Upstream segment of this week’s Radio Free Acton podcast, I discuss the visual art of Renee Radell with Gregory Wolfe. Radell’s work is the subject of Renee Radell: Web of Circumstance (Predmore Press, 2016, 220 pages, $80), a book presenting a career overview of her artistic efforts. Continue Reading...

Knowledge, humility and evangelical witness

“On September 1, Pope Francis and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew issued a joint message for the ‘World Day of Prayer for Creation.’” says Rev. Gregory Jensen in this week’s Acton Commentary. “Their statement rightfully reminds us that we all have an ‘obligation to use the Earth’s goods responsibly.’ But exhortations by the pope and patriarch should not be read as a policy prescription.” Unlike theology, science speaks in probability. Continue Reading...

Our economic age of anxiety

“Developed nations are increasingly haunted by doubts about the legitimacy of their economic structures,” says Victor V. Claar and Greg Forster in this week’s Acton Commentary. “This paralyzing anxiety crosses all lines of ethnicity, religion, class, party and ideology.” This is not a mere selfish concern about who gets how much of what. Continue Reading...

The moral hazard of fuzzy contracts

“You may already be aware that many state and local public pensions are in trouble,” says Victor V. Claar in this week’s Acton Commentary. “By one estimate, the nation’s state, county, and municipal governments face a combined funding shortfall of about $5 trillion. Continue Reading...

Finding ‘the lost tools of learning’

“If you were to read Dorothy Sayers’ The Lost Tools of Learning and thereafter read the curriculum of Veritas Classical Academy,” says Elizabeth Yeh in this week’s Acton Commentary, “you would find that the “lost tools” have been found in the small town of Marietta, Ohio.” The curriculum at Veritas is based on the Trivium. Continue Reading...

Saving Charlie Gard

“The case of 11-month-old Charlie Gard continues to garner international attention and pleas for his life from Donald Trump and Pope Francis,” says Anne Rathbone Bradley in this week’s Acton Commentary. Continue Reading...