Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Christian Social Thought

An evangelical manifesto on wealth creation

Earlier this year two evangelical groups, the Lausanne Movement and BAM Global, met in Thailand to “discuss various aspects of wealth creation, including justice, poverty, Biblical foundation, wealth creators, stewardship of creation and the role of the church.” During the meeting 30 people from 20 nations, primarily from the business world, and also from church, missions and academia, put together the Wealth Creation Manifesto: Affirmations 1. Continue Reading...

Putting Columbus in context

A few years ago the following quote from Christopher Columbus started making the rounds: For one woman they give a hundred castellanos, as for a farm; and this sort of trading is very common, and there are already a great number of merchants who go in search of girls; there are at this moment some nine or ten on sale; they fetch a good price, let their age be what it will. Continue Reading...

Pope, Patriarch need theology of civilization

Today at Public Orthodoxy, I examine the recent claim of Pope Francis and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew that The human environment and the natural environment are deteriorating together, and this deterioration of the planet weighs upon the most vulnerable of its people. Continue Reading...

Business as a calling

Do you live vocationally in your day job, even if you aren’t making a career of it? God’s calling on your life is not a maintenance request, the task is not finite, nor is it particular. Continue Reading...

The spiritual core of liberty

Last week FEE published an essay by economist Dierdre McCloskey titled “The Core of Liberty is Economic Liberty.” McCloskey writes, [E]conomic liberty is the liberty about which most ordinary people care. Continue Reading...

Thinking about the ethics and economics of ‘price gouging’

A reporter posted a picture on Twitter yesterday that showed a Best Buy in Houston charging $42 for a case of Dasani water. The picture also showed a case of Smartwater for $29, with a sign noting there was a “limited supply.” Not surprisingly, the outrage on social media prodded Best Buy to quickly respond by claiming it was a mistake. Continue Reading...