Posts tagged with: avery dulles

For those concerned with a vigorous intellectual engagement of the religious idea with the secular culture, these past 12 months have been a difficult period.

On February 28, 2008, William F. Buckley, Jr. the intellectual godfather of the conservative movement in America, died. Only last month, Avery Cardinal Dulles, SJ, passed away at 90 years old. Cardinal Dulles was one of the Catholic Church’s most prominent theologians, a thinker of great subtlety, and a descendent from a veritable American Brahmin dynasty.

Father Richard John Neuhaus

The third in this towering intellectual triumvirate is Father Richard John Neuhaus, who died in New York after an on and off again battle with cancer, about which he had written in his now mini-classic, As I Lay Dying: Meditations Upon Returning.

This book is unlike any written in our time in that it is a profoundly serious reflection on questions everyone has, issues everyone thinks about in private, but hardly anyone is willing to speak about or perhaps capable of writing about. Fr. Neuhaus confronts it to the point in which we feel discomfort – and he did this on nearly every issue he wrote about in his long writing career.

How will we be held accountable at death for what we did in life? What does mortality mean? What does it mean to face judgment? How should we live with the questions we have about eternity, and what is the impact on culture and responsibility?

In times past we had a greater clarity about these questions than we do today. Today, if we think about death at all, it is only to keep it as far away as possible, to forestall it, to deny it, and pretend that it doesn’t happen to others and will not happen to us.

Fr. Neuhaus wrote the following:

We are born to die. Not that death is the purpose of our being born, but we are born toward death, and in each of our lives the work of dying is already underway. The work of dying well is, in largest part, the work of living well. Most of us are at ease in discussing what makes for a good life, but we typically become tongue-tied and nervous when the discussion turns to a good death. As children of a culture radically, even religiously, devoted to youth and health, many find it incomprehensible, indeed offensive, that the word ‘good’ should in any way be associated with death. Death, it is thought, is an unmitigated evil, the very antithesis of all that is good. Death is to be warded off by exercise, by healthy habits, by medical advances. What cannot be halted can be delayed, and what cannot forever be delayed can be denied. But all our progress and all our protest notwithstanding, the mortality rate holds steady at 100 percent.

Fascinating, provocative, fearless, counter-cultural, and absolutely impossible to ignore. It puts matters of faith at the center, making them impossible to deny. That is the power of Fr. Neuhaus’s mind at work, and it worked for many decades producing an incredible literary legacy. (more…)

Blog author: jcouretas
posted by on Friday, December 12, 2008
Avery Cardinal Dulles lecturing at the Acton Institute.

I knew the reputation of Avery Dulles, SJ, long before I entered that classroom at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., back in the early 1980s when I was in seminary. I knew he was considered, even then, the dean of Catholic theologians in the United States, author of scholarly essays and books too numerous to name, peritus (theological expert) at the Second Vatican Council and the son of a prominent New York Presbyterian family whose father was John Foster Dulles, Secretary of State under President Eisenhower and whose uncle was Allen Dulles, director of the CIA. I knew he had been a convert to Catholicism during his years at Harvard University after having declared himself an agnostic in his first year there.

The intellectual stature of the man was intimidating, but once someone encountered him personally, one found the gentle, humble soul of a sincere Christian. He had a mischievous sense of humor which was evident to anyone who noticed him driving a beat up old car around campus with a small bumper sticker promoting the local airport, “Fly Dulles” (named after his father). Once, while a passenger in that car, we were speaking about liberation theology and he said:

“Sitting in that very seat you are in right now was (mentioning the name of a prominent liberation theologian). When he asked why I drove such an old clunker, he became rather uncomfortable when I told him it was a gift from my uncle Allen. He looked for wiretaps the rest of the trip.”

Even though some referred to him as “Dull Dulles,” I found that being in class with him was an exhilarating experience. It was akin to witnessing a train slowly leaving the station. Initially the student (this student!) would feel satisfied that the material was clear and comprehensible. Point would begin to build upon point, stretching the mind. And just at that precise moment when it all became too complex and difficult to follow, Fr. Dulles would take it up just one more notch, and then … the class bell would ring.

Avery Cardinal Dulles (center) and Rev. Robert A. Sirico (right) at the 1998 Kuyper Leo XIII conference in Grand Rapids, Mich.

In 2001, I was honored to attend the consistory in Rome at which Fr. Dulles was elevated by Pope John Paul II to being a Prince of the Church, Avery Cardinal Dulles. He was the first American theologian to be given that title without being made a bishop first. I could not help but think, on that brilliant day, that the mischievous aspect of his personality came out as the pope went to place the red hat on his head. Always an awkward man, tall and lanky, the hat immediately fell off the new cardinal’s head back into the lap of the pope. I am sure I could hear a knowing laugh go up from the crowd gathered in the Piazza from his students who know him well.

Avery Dulles was a mentor who first introduced me to the work of philosopher Michael Polyani and deepened my appreciation for John Henry Cardinal Newman, that great 19th figure who struck me as very much like Dulles himself. Fr. Dulles was tall, a theologian, a convert to Catholicism, was not a bishop before he became a Cardinal, and he even resembled Newman in a way.

Fr. Dulles was was a model of authentic ecumenical encounter, and was an enthusiastic participant in the Kuyper Leo XIII conference that Acton co-sponsored in Grand Rapids with Calvin Theological Seminary College in 1998. He also spoke at a number of Acton Institute conferences and seminars over the years. On a more personal note, I shall never forget how Fr. Dulles honored me by concelebrating my First Mass in Brooklyn.

I shall miss his wise council and sense of humor. Although the Church on earth has lost a loyal and humble son, it is my hope that the Church in heaven has gained a true prince indeed.

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Some links to Fr. Dulles’ work at Acton:

Truth as the Ground of Freedom: A Theme from John Paul II. Acton monograph available from the Acton Bookshoppe

Acton Audio: Truth as the Ground of Freedom

Centesimus Annus and the Renewal of Culture. Journal of Markets & Morality

Religious Freedom and Pluralism. Journal of Markets & Morality

The Splendor of Faith: The Theological Vision of Pope John Paul II. Review by Kevin Schmiesing, Ph.D. Journal of Markets & Morality

Enjoying and Making Use of a Responsible Freedom. Religion & Liberty

God’s Gift of Freedom Must be Used to Choose the Good. Religion & Liberty