Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'education'

Acton books distributed to schools by Theological Book Network

The Acton Institute recently donated a number of titles on faith, work, and economics to the Theological Book Network which will distribute them to its partner institutions in what it calls the ‘Majority World’ (‘Majority World’ is a term coined to replace earlier sometimes anachronistic or misleading terms like ‘Third World’ or ‘Developing World’). Continue Reading...

Education as liberation: 4 priorities for reform

With the recent appointment and confirmation of Betsy DeVos as Secretary of Education, the movement for educational choice has plenty of reasons for optimism. Throughout the nomination process, opponents of DeVos ridiculed the school-choice movement for caring little about quality, equality, and opportunity, ignoring that these are the precise drivers of advocates for school choice. Continue Reading...

Audio & Video: Sirico & Bonicelli on the Trump Administration

As the Trump Administration begins its work this week, the media continues to call on the Acton Institute for analysis and commentary, both in the US and abroad. Internationally, Acton Director of Programs and Education Paul Bonicelli joined host Alex Jensen on tbs eFM 101.3’s “This Morning” program in Seoul, South Korea on January 22nd to discuss the economic challenges facing the incoming administration, and the likelihood of potential trade conflicts between the United States and other nations down the road based on the protectionist rhetoric from Trump both on the campaign trail and during the presidential transition. Continue Reading...

The trivium of business school

Note: This is the second in a series on developing a Christian mind in business school. You can find the intro post here. When people ask me what business school was like, I’m tempted to say, “A lot like a medieval university.” Unfortunately, that comparison makes people think b-school is dark, musty, and full of monks—which is not quite what I mean. Continue Reading...