Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'Law/Crime'

Defend the Rule of Law, Not Judicial Supremacy

One of the core principles of the Acton Institute is the importance of the rule of law: “The government’s primary responsibility is to promote the common good, that is, to maintain the rule of law, and to preserve basic duties and rights.” While most conservatives would agree with this sentiment, there has recently been a lot of confusion about what defending the rule of law requires and entails. Continue Reading...

A Plea for Prosperity

At the prodding of my friend Victor Claar, here’s a plea based on the significance of the Vulcan salute pioneered by Leonard Nimoy, who passed away today at the age of 83. Continue Reading...

Entering The Dark Web To Hunt Human Traffickers

We all use search engines every day. Don’t know a word? Google it. Can’t remember exactly what that restaurant’s address was? Yahoo will know. These search engines (and others) are extremely helpful for our everyday lives; they help us shop, do our jobs, attend to school work and link us to entertainment and games. Continue Reading...

Explainer: 21 Egyptian Christians Beheaded in Libya

What just happened in Libya? Islamic State (IS) released a video on Sunday that appeared to show the beheadings of 21 Egyptian Christians in Libya. The footage showing the deaths of the Egyptian martyrs appeared on the Twitter feed of a website that supports IS. Continue Reading...

Federal Court Rules Religious Organizations Can Hire (and Fire) for Religious Reasons

Earlier today a federal appeals court handed down an important ruling that protects the liberties of religious organizations. In the case of Alyce Conlon v. InterVarsity Christian Fellowship/USA, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit rejected a plaintiff’s attempt to enforce state and federal gender discrimination laws on one of the nation’s largest Christian campus ministries. Continue Reading...

From Inmates to CEOs

If you’re a convicted criminal, finding a job while you’re in prison is often easier than getting one after you’ve served your time. Because of an expansive list of mandatory post-release sanctions, inmates often leave prison facing what Jeremy Travis, the president of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and a former director of the National Institute of Justice, has called a secondary “invisible punishment” that is frequently more severe than the one levied by any judge or jury. Continue Reading...