Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'Political philosophy'

6 thought-provoking quotes from AEI’s ‘Economic Freedom and Human Flourishing’

School of Athens by Raphael In considering issues of political economy today, it is always prudent to refer to wisdom from the past.  The American Enterprise Institute’s recent publication “Economic Freedom and Human Flourishing: Perspectives from Political Philosophy” is a collection of essays that analyzes the thought of several prominent philosophers on the connection between the title’s two subjects. Continue Reading...

Why Is ‘The Touch Of Man’ A Bad Thing?

“In the Beginning”artist Mako Fujimura The hubby and I were watching TV when a commercial for Fiji Water came on. The voiceover expounded all the wonderful features of this water, and then said something about it being “untouched by man.” I turned to my husband and said, “Did I hear that right? Continue Reading...

Religion & Liberty: From Shark Tank to Redemption

The Houston- based Prison Entrepreneurship Program looks at convicted criminals as if they were “raw metal in the hands of a blacksmith – crude, formless, and totally moldable.” PEP puts prisoners through a rigorous character training and business skills regimen to prepare them for a productive, even flourishing, re-entry to life after incarceration. Continue Reading...

What is Liberal Morality?

“Three recent events have made me reflect on a certain theme that should be of interest to religious-minded advocates of the free society,” says Kishore Jayabalan in this week’s Acton Commentary. Continue Reading...

Free-Market Federalism

“States and municipalities craft laws that reflect local cultures, and this proximity to the people has market consequences,” says James Bruce in this week’s Acton Commentary. “Let’s call it free-market federalism, the encouragement of local markets by permitting states and municipalities to frame, as much as possible, the laws by which the communities engage in commerce.” In a spirited defense of decentralization, Abraham Kuyper argues that a central government can only supplement local governments and families. Continue Reading...