Posts tagged with: Pope Francis

Blog author: bwalker
Friday, July 3, 2015
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Enviros That Supported The Pope’s Encyclical Tout Abortion To Solve Global Warming
Michael Bastasch, Daily Caller

Here’s some irony for you. The same environmentalists that fervently supported the Pope’s call for global governance over the climate and oceans are also pushing explicitly anti-Catholic policies to fight global warming: more access to contraceptives and abortion.The Sierra Club was just one of many environmental groups that supported the Pope’s call to address man-made global warming. When Pope Francis published his encyclical in June, they issued a strong statement of support for the Bishop of Rome’s call to action.

Vatican considers divesting from fossil fuels
Timothy Cama, The Hill

Max Hohenberg, spokesman for the Vatican’s bank, told the newspaper the issue is largely irrelevant, because about 95 percent of the bank’s investments are in government bonds, so “there isn’t much to divest.”

The Amazing Vanishing Climate Change Fund!
The American Interest

But these announcements are not a cure-all for the problems that threaten to bedevil the climate summit. Conspicuously absent from all of these announcements were any concrete contributions to a proposed $100 billion fund intended to assist the world’s poorer countries in coping with climate change. As it’s currently sketched out, the developed world would pay into this massive fund annually, and that money would go towards helping the developing world mitigate and adapt to climate change. But as Bloomberg reports, little progress has been made towards seeing this policy realized:

How the Pope Is Revving up Climate Action in LA’s Most Polluted Neighborhood
Jasmine Aguilera, Moyers & Company

After the June 18 release of “Laudato Si,” Pope Francis’ encyclical on the environment and humanity’s responsibility to protect it, young Catholics decided to host a rally to spread awareness of climate change’s effect on the poor, particularly Latinos in Southern California. Some Catholics are hopeful that events like this, inspired by the encyclical, will spread and lead to a new emphasis on climate action within the faith.

Pope Francis Heads to Iowa to Press Republicans on Marriage Climate
Breitbart News

“You see a lot of coalitions of Catholics and evangelicals working on the life issue together,” Scheffler said. “You could lose some Catholics to this. Some priests buy into that whole social justice, income distribution thing. But not all of them.”

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Blog author: bwalker
Friday, July 3, 2015
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Naomi Klein

In my lifetime I’ve witnessed some odd pairings – Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga being among the most recent – but none so bizarre as Pope Francis and Naomi Klein. The Pope needs no explanation, but Ms. Klein may leave some readers scratching their heads. The telegenic Canadian activist actually was invited to participate in a stacked-deck of climate-change true-believers at the Vatican.

Organizers of the event, “Planet First: The Imperative to Change Course” – held July 1 and July 2 at Rome’s Augustinianum University – also invited Professor Ottmar Edenhofer, president of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; Bernd Nilles, secretary general of CISDE – “an international alliance of Catholic development agencies working together for global justice;” Flaminia Giovannelli from the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace; and Fr. Federico Lombardi, director of the Holy See Press Office. Where was Bill McKibben and Al Gore? (more…)

Blog author: bwalker
Thursday, July 2, 2015
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Pope got some wrong, a little right
Doug Bandow, National View

The Vatican’s new papal encyclical on the environment is a highly political discussion of the theology of the environment. Pope Francis mixes heartfelt concern for ecology with an often limited or confused understanding of the problem of pollution and the meaning of markets. Despite his commitment to environmental values, the pope acknowledges that “this rediscovery of nature can never be at the cost of the freedom and responsibility of human beings.” Nevertheless, humanity’s obligation for the environment is complex and the pope discusses ecological values in the context of economic development and care for the poor.

What Pope Francis gets right–and wrong–about climate change
W. David Montgomery, Fox News

The poor in wealthy countries, however, will suffer additionally from the efforts Pope Francis proposes to limit emissions, as the price of energy rises against their small and sometimes shrinking incomes. This will be particularly true in the United States if regulations like the Environmental Protection Agency’s draconian new rules to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from power plants are implemented, because they effectively knock out use of the least costly sources of electricity.

St. Francis of Assisi: The Inspiration for the Pope’s Encyclical On Climate Change
Kit Kennedy, National Resources Defense Council

Pope Francis’ recent Encyclical on climate change has rightly received broad attention worldwide for its forceful message that action on climate change is necessary to protect the world’s poor. But little has been written about the important Medieval Church figure who provides both the title and much of the inspiration for the Encyclical (which is a papal letter to Catholics and all people of goodwill worldwide). That is St. Francis of Assisi, the 12th century friar and preacher whose name and style Pope Francis adopted when he became Pontiff. St. Francis’ song “Canticle of the Creatures,” praising God for the beauty of nature, provides the title of the Encyclical – “Laudato Si” – meaning “praised be to you” in St. Francis’ native Umbrian. And St. Francis is also the direct source for much of the Encyclical’s spirit and message.

The Best And Worst Media Interviews With Climate-Denying Presidential Candidate
Kevin Kalhoefer, Media Matters

CNN’s Jake Tapper has offered an instructive example of how to address presidential candidates’ climate denial during his interviews with real estate mogul Donald Trump and former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-PA). On the June 28 edition of CNN’s State of the Union, Tapper responded to Trump’s declaration that he is “not a huge believer in the global warming phenomenon” by telling Trump that “the overwhelming majority of scientists say it’s real and it’s man-made.”

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Blog author: bwalker
Wednesday, July 1, 2015
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Debate: Has the world improved in the last 60 years?
Max Roser

At the Oxford Martin School I debated with Anders Sandberg from Oxford’s Future of Humanity Institute and Robert Walker from the University’s Social Policy department whether we achieved to build a better world.

Programme of the Pope’s trip to Cuba and the U.S.A. and his visit to the United Nations
Vatican Information Service

The Pope will depart from Rome’s Fiumicino airport at 10 a.m. on Saturday 19 September and is expected to arrive at 4.05 p.m. in Havana, Cuba, where the welcome ceremony will take place. On Sunday 20 September he will celebrate Holy Mass in Plaza de la Revolucion in Havana and will pay a courtesy visit to the president of the Council of State and of the Council of Ministers of the Republic in the Palace of the Revolution. Later he will celebrate Vespers in the Cathedral with priests, men and women religious, and seminarians, and will subsequently greet the young in the Fr. Felix Varela Cultural Centre.

The Theological Mind of Laudato Si’
Eduardo Echeverra, Homiletic & Pastoral Review

In this article, I consciously refrain from considering the parts of Pope Francis’s new Encyclical Letter, Laudato Si’ (hereafter LS) that have been the most contentiously received, namely: his views of a free market system, the nature and extent of the ecological crisis, the science of climate change, Francis’s alleged anti-modernism, and apocalyptic view of history, and so forth. I am concerned that the reception of this encyclical threatens to miss the forest for the trees, as it were. Hence, my approach to the encyclical is to consider the theological mind that informs its framework.

Vatican hosts conference on ‘the imperative to change course’ on the environment
Catholic World News

“The COP21 conference for climate change (Paris, 30 November to 11 December 2015) will be crucial in identifying strong solutions for climate change,” stated Cardinal Peter Turkson, president of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, whose remarks were read out at the conference. “The political dimension needs to re-establish democratic control over the economy and finance, that is, over the basic choices made by human societies.”

Cardinal Turkson addresses UN meeting on climate change
Vatican Radio

The President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, Cardinal Peter Turkson, conveyed the greetings and encouragement of Pope Francis, and drew attention to the new Papal encyclical on ecology, Laudato si’. Listen to the full address by Cardinal Turkson:

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Blog author: bwalker
Tuesday, June 30, 2015
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Matt Ridley on Climate Change
Russ Roberts, Library of Economics and Liberty

Science writer and author Matt Ridley discusses climate change with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Based on his reading of the scientific evidence, Ridley describes himself as a “lukewarmer.” While Ridley agrees that humans have made the climate warmer, he argues that the impact is small or positive over some temperature ranges and regions. He rejects the catastrophic scenarios that some say are sufficiently likely to justify dramatic policy responses, and he reflects on the challenges of staking out an unpopular position on a contentious policy issue.

Pope in US to meet with homeless, prisoners and immigrants
Nicole Winfield, Associated Press

Pope Francis will meet with homeless people, immigrants and prisoners during his upcoming trip to Cuba and the United States. He’ll also preside over a meeting about religious liberty – a major issue for the U.S. Catholic Church in the wake of the Supreme Court’s gay marriage decision.

Dalai Lama Endorses Pope Francis’s Encyclical on Climate Change
Cole Mellino, EcoWatch

The Tibetan spiritual leader also spoke about the need to end war, calling the concept of war “outdated.” The Dalai Lama said we need to shift our focus to launch a global effort to tackle climate change. “Countries think about their own national interest rather than global interests and that needs to change because the environment is a global issue.”

Thousands Take to Rome’s Streets to Echo Pope Francis’ Call for Climate Action Thousands Take to Rome’s Streets to Echo Pope Francis’ Call for Climate Action
Hoda Baraka, 350.org

The celebratory march was animated by a musical band, a climate choir and colourful public artwork designed by artists from Italy and other countries, whose work played a major role in the People’s Climate March in New York City last September. Among the artwork was a 75-meter sign in the shape of a green leaf, with verses from Scripture which speak to God’s care for creation and for the poor.

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pope plant“Laudato si, mi’ Signore!” Both the title and first line of the most recent papal encyclical come from St. Francis’ canticle which looks at nature as a great gift, but you all know that. Every news source worth its salt made that clear before the encyclical was released (either time); yet, we as Christians are called to be salt of the Earth. This entails more than a brief glance at the word on the street about the ecological pronouncement. What is at stake here is the central call of humanity: to till and keep the gifted garden (Genesis 2:15). The first human was placed in this role of cultivation of the earth even before being told to not eat from the tree of knowledge of good and evil. There was a promise to act and a law to keep. The Bible is divided into two halves: law in the Old Testament and promise in the New Testament. The call to be salt of the earth is about the Christian life fulfilling that promise. Note that the law followed the promise in the order of our creation. Core to human being was first the love of the life of the world–the greatest commandment as Christ said. So, then why is the reactionary focus of the encyclical even before it was released surrounded upon the policy, the law, that it would inspire and not the call to promise?

Surely within the encyclical there is language that leads to law being created. What Pope Francis has seen in the world directly articulates the life he leads–one unaccepting of a “globalization of indifference” for any child of God’s in need. (more…)

Blog author: bwalker
Monday, June 29, 2015
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Good Stewards of the Earth
Religions for Peace New Faiths for Earth Campaign

Shortcomings undercut message of encyclical
Doug Bandow, Philly.com

For instance, the encyclical complains much of capitalism as well as property rights, which, in the pope’s view, allow selfish individuals to act against the public interest. Yet capitalism provides the resources and technology to improve environmental protection. Indeed, the holy father acknowledges that “science and technology are wonderful products of a God-given human creativity.”

Pope Francis’s Encyclical Makes Waves from Brazil to the Philippines
Sergio Mello e Sousza and Brother Jaazeal Jakosalem, OAR

Faith can move mountains and, combined with scientific facts, can open people’s hearts and minds in a powerful way. The pope clearly sees that fighting climate change and restoring the Earth’s ecosystems is a moral duty we have to our fellow humans, to future generations and to Creation itself. This is a message that we find in the sacred texts of many other religions. Caring for the Earth is caring for the common good.

Steyer climate group cites Pope Francis in new ads
Timothy Cama, The Hill

NextGen launched an ad on YouTube last week, putting the pope alongside the Pentagon and business leaders who have called for action on climate change.

U.S. Must Take the Lead on Pope Francis’ Call on Climate Change
Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA), Huffington Post

The Vatican’s commitment was clear to me when I visited there last year as the only American representative in a group of six legislators from around the world who were working to address climate change in their own countries. My international colleagues shared the impacts of global warming on their people — the destruction by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, the droughts that harmed Mexico and South Africa. I spoke of the impacts on coastal Massachusetts from record-breaking ocean temperatures and rising sea levels. We all agreed that the world’s poorest are suffering the worst consequences — extreme poverty, famine, and disease.

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Sirico appearing on InfoBae TV in March.

While at Acton University not too long ago, Buenos Aires journalist Adrián Bono sat down with Rev. Robert Sirico to discuss Laudato Si’. Bono recently wrote about his interview with Acton’s president and co-founder at Infobae. “Muchos no saben que la encíclica depende de la hermenéutica,” Sirico argued, “que significa cómo puede interpretada. No es un documento infalible.” Simply put, Laudato Si’ is not a binding document for Catholics, but many don’t understand that. He continues on that thought:

Merece respeto, pero no necesariamente significa que los creyentes deben seguirla. En lo que respecta a sus enseñanzas de la doctrina, los católicos tienen la obligación fiel de seguirla, pero en lo que hace a sus declaraciones empíricas, esas se le dejan a la comunidad científica para que sean debatidas. La ciencia es un proceso abierto de debate y descubrimiento…A veces el Papa es imprudente al hablar de conjeturas científicas y análisis económico.”

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Blog author: bwalker
Friday, June 26, 2015
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The Pope, the Globe, and the Facts
Cal Thomas, Townhall.com

Is it worth radically altering our economies and lifestyles and giving government even more power over us for a climate change faith that has not been fully debated and is problematic at best and wrong at worst?

The Pope’s “Science Advisor” Is an Atheist Who Worships the Earth
The Rush Limbaugh Show

The word for it in the story that I found, one of the most credible stories, is a pantheist, which is a variation of atheist. A pantheist is somebody that believes the earth is a living organism that has the equivalent of a brain and reacts to horrible things done to it by humans.

U.S. has the strategy to back up Pope’s climate change appeal
The Lowell Sun

What’s the most efficient way of reducing harmful emissions? MIT Energy Economics Professor Christopher Knittel shows that revenue-neutral surcharges on emissions are far more efficient than present regulations. Present laws require new cars to be more fuel-efficient. For instance, electric cars get the equivalent of 100 mpg.

Heed the pope’s call for action on climate change
James Corbett, Seacoast Online

In contrast to the Pope, the President, and the majority of the American people, however, climate deniers and their allies in Congress are still trying to block public health and environmental safeguards. On the day the encyclical was released, the Senate Appropriations Committee advanced a bill aimed at dismantling the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s Clean Power Plan, which sets the first ever federal limits on carbon pollution from existing power plants. It’s time for polluters and their congressional allies to stop trying to block action on climate, and start working to protect our public health, our environment, and our future.

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Blog author: bwalker
Thursday, June 25, 2015
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Conservative Catholics Try to Domesticate Laudato Si
Patricia Miller, Religion Dispatches

Meanwhile, the response from the US leadership of the church to Francis’ urgent plea for action has been noticeably muted. Mark Silk reports that at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ eagerly anticipated presser on the encyclical last week, Washington Cardinal Donald Wuerl and other leaders seemed to go out of their way to tone down Francis’ message….

Pope Francis’s Poverty And Environment Ideas Will Worsen Both
Kathleen Hartnett White, The Federalist

As a lifelong Catholic with graduate degrees in religious studies and a long stint as the head of an environmental agency second in size only to the Environmental Protection Agency, I am deeply troubled by Pope Francis’ encyclical “Praise to You, Lord (Laudato, Si’): On Care of Our Common Home.” Long anticipated for revelation of the pope’s support for a global climate treaty, the encyclical is, and is not, focused on global warming.

Where Did Pope Francis’s Extravagant Rant Come From?
Maureen Mullarkey, The Federalist

Subversion of Christianity by the spirit of the age has been a hazard down the centuries. The significance of “Laudato Si” lies beyond its stated concern for the climate. Discount obfuscating religious language. The encyclical lays ground to legitimize global government and makes the church an instrument of propaganda—a herald for the upcoming United Nations (UN) Climate Change Conference in Paris.

The pope’s climate change message is really about rethinking what it means to be human
Stephen P. White, Vox

What makes this encyclical controversial is its reading of contested questions of science, economics, and politics. What makes it radical — in the sense of going to the root — is the pope’s reading of the profound human crisis that he sees underlying our modern world. Abuse of our environment isn’t the only problem facing humanity. In fact, Pope Francis sees the ecological crisis as a symptom of a deeper crisis — a human crisis. These two problems are related and interdependent. And the solution is not simply to eliminate fossil fuels or rethink carbon credits. The pope is calling on the world to rediscover what it means to be human — and as a result, to reject the cult of economic growth and material accumulation

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