Posts tagged with: Technology/Internet

Blog author: jcouretas
Monday, August 29, 2011
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The Acton Institute has released a mobile app for smart phones and tablets based on the Android operating system. The free app keeps users up to date with the latest PowerBlog posts, commentaries, events and other goings on at the institute. Point your desktop/laptop computer or smart phone to the Android Market.

In the pipeline — the Acton iPhone app for Apple mobile devices. Stay tuned!

News broke yesterday of an audacious violation of Apple Computer’s intellectual property rights (IPR) in China. This expat blogger posted photos of three sham Apple Stores she discovered in the city of Kunming—the stores have been set up by some entrepreneurial chap hoping to capitalize on the company’s Chinese popularity.

The story was slightly amusing, especially in light of Apple’s recent earnings announcement. (“They totally did it again,” said one analyst. It was also revealed that Apple now sits on enough cash in hand to buy 100% of Goldman Sachs at its current market value.) It seems that the Apple brand is now so valuable that the Chinese are counterfeiting the company’s retail outlets to sell Apple’s own products at full price. As one employee of the fake store said when reached by the Wall Street Journal,

It doesn’t make much of a difference for us whether we’re authorized or not. I just care that what I sell every day are authentic Apple products, and that our customers don’t come back to me to complain about the quality of the products.

But that’s precisely why Apple’s IPR must be protected. The company is one of the most innovative ever—their graphical user interface, popularization of the computer mouse, iPod music player, and touch-screen devices have dragged the technology sector forward, to say nothing of their design contributions—and that innovation would not have been supported without protections for the company’s intellectual property.

The U.S. Constitution justifies the establishment of IPR in giving Congress the power

To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.

As David H. Carey explains in his Acton monograph The Social Mortgage of Intellectual Property,

If allowing some techonology to be patented benefits society in the long run more than it costs society temporarily to forego unrestricted use of that technology, then such patents are morally defensible.

The Apple Store “experience” is tightly bound up with the company’s products (remember how miserably Dell stores failed?), and part of allowing Apple temporary exclusive use of its inventions is allowing it to sell them as it sees fit.

There is also the question of trademark, which exists primarily for the protection of consumers, so that when I buy a tube of Crest toothpaste from a CVS I know that I’m not getting a Chinese imitation accidentally laced with cyanide, stocked by a shyster posing as a reputable franchisee.

Whatever employees of these fake Apple Stores may say—and according to the blogger who broke the story, none of the stores’ sales force realized at the time that they weren’t working for Apple—it’s China! Would you buy an iPhone from one of the fake stores? The Chinese government has a responsibility to its citizens to enforce Apple’s trademarks and protect its citizens from fraud.

By pure coincidence, I can illustrate the importance of protecting IPR in China: Yesterday, about the time this story was hitting the internet, my father went to the Apple Store in Dallas (an authentic one) and purchased an iPad. While he is away for a week on a theology course, Apple’s device will give him access to email and other business tools, so that he can grow in virtue and keep his business running at the same time (and once they debut the iSpankings app, he’ll be able to keep his kids in line, too). He chose an iPad over any number of other devices because his IT guy—who doesn’t like Macs, as IT guys never do—told him it would do the job best.

Except for the U.S.’s protection of IPR, that market solution wouldn’t have been possible.

I usually feel sorry when I see the latest news about data compromise, hacks, or identity theft.  Though I feel for the victims, I also think about the individuals carrying out the act.  Society rightly looks down on such behavior, especially if the victims are everyday people.

What about when a high profile organization or government is hacked?  What if an organization of questionable reputation is targeted?  The online group Anonymous often aims at high profile targets with their hacks, DDoS attacks and other planned invasions.  By making the decision to compromise organizations, even questionable ones, Anonymous assumes responsibility for its actions.  Individuals that are a part of this online group hide their real identity to commit acts that are illegal.

Growing up, I believe most young people interested in computing are aware that there is a “wrong path.”  As in, property damage and theft are wrong.  This path includes learning how to break into different types of computer systems to seek information or modify a system’s behavior, typically for reasons advantageous to the hacker.  Anyone that is involved with technology knows this path exists.  Luckily, most of us are taught to respect others’ property, even if that property is digital.  What’s more, this activity undermines the rule of law and the ability of people to freely create wealth (see Acton’s Core Principles).

Computer programming is an important craft.  It’s simple to learn a little programming, but as you advance in skill the tasks become easier to perform.  Whether it is building a website, desktop computer application, or a small game, many people obtain enjoyment out of building unique and useful tools and products.  However, the same skills can be used to make an application that tricks people, steals their information or prevents their computer from functioning properly.  Individuals who make these keyloggers, trojans and worms typically do so out of greed or hate.

People break into computer networks or systems with malicious intent are called black hat hackers.  As you might expect, there are also white hat hackers.  White hats break into computer networks and systems too, but instead of taking advantage of the system’s weakness, they notify the owner of the system about the vulnerability so they may fix the problem.  Computer security is a classic case of good versus evil.  You might even call it one of those moral issues that are clearly black and white.

What stops black hats from becoming white hats?  Unfortunately, if there were no black hats there would also be no need for white hats.  Most white hats start out as black hats since learning the craft requires knowledge of breaking into systems.  White hats make a legitimate living through consulting and by working in organizations to ensure systems are secure.  They (hopefully) have a strong sense of right, especially if they start out as a white hat.

Even if you don’t know someone who works in computer security, it’s likely that your favorite IT person deals with security on a daily basis.  The IT professional that the white hat informs must secure their system against compromise, which requires knowledge of how hackers break in.  System owners are stewards of activity and information they manage.  They have the same access that hackers have to information stored in computers they work with.  Their job is to protect that information as well as ensuring its proper use within the system.

If the system administrator fails at their job, unsuspecting individuals using the system lose something.  It might be privacy, financial information, their own computer’s security or even their identity.  Black hats and hackers like the ones from Anonymous abuse gaps in security for their own amusement, personal reasons and notoriety.  They lack basic concepts of morality and are especially void of respect for any IT professional or individuals on the receiving end of their attack.

Continuing the tradition from 2010, Acton University 2011 lectures will be available for purchase online from our secure order page.  New lectures will be posted as they conclude throughout the week, so check back often.

The downloads are in MP3 format and can be transferred to any device that plays audio files such as an iPod or smartphone.

Here are some useful Acton University links:

We’ve launched a redesigned Acton PowerBlog but there’s more to it than just a visual update.  You’ll find the following enhancements:

  • A simpler look that seeks to better emphasize important features of the blog
  • Convenient tab navigation on the right for frequently used items
  • Increased real estate for blog posts like the one you’re reading
  • Increased emphasis on social media including:
    • New links near the top right and bottom of the page to Acton’s key social pages
    • A live Facebook page stream on the right so you can see what’s happening without leaving the blog
    • More “Like” and send buttons on front page blog posts (not just the first one)
  • A new comment system that preserves all old comments while adding increased functionality
  • A better subscribe page with more feed links and information

The new comment system is probably the largest change after the redesign itself.  With this system (called Disqus) you no longer have to type your name and email every time you want to comment.  Now you can login with an account from a number of websites including Facebook, Twitter, and Disqus itself in order to comment here.  You can also give feedback on comments by liking and replying to them.  If you have a Disqus account you can build a “commenter reputation” and your comments will carry more social weight with people seeking higher quality insights.

We welcome your feedback in the comments for this post.

 

David Lohmeyer has done it again. Following this gem from the original series, David has turned up a clip from Star Trek: The Next Generation in which Captain Picard quotes Lord Acton:

David’s continuing mission? To find such quotes from the rest of the Star Trek series, including Deep Space Nine, Voyager, and Enterprise (we’ll give him a pass on the cartoon series).

The traditional Drupal logo

Last week I attended Drupalcon Chicago 2011.  Acton Institute’s website runs the Content Management System called Drupal.  It is a highly customizable website publishing tool that powers around 1.7% of the Internet.  Drupal scales: you can use it for a personal  website, but very large outfits use Drupal including the White House and Grammy.

As you may know, open source software is free.  Anyone can download the package and begin using it or view the internal code.  Open source also means the software is coded by programmers who are not paid for their work.

How can such a model exist?  It exists because customers hire developers to support and implement their websites using the platform.  At this point, the “free” software can require a substantial investment of money and staff time to tailor or customize the open source software to an organization’s specific needs. Still, the model promotes learning for aspiring developers because they can dig into the system early on without paying to see if it is something they’d like to pursue.  If it is something they like they can program, design, or provide consulting using the platform for clients willing to pay for it.  If the developer doesn’t want to continue working with the platform they are free to stop without having sacrificed money figuring out they don’t want to work with it.

The (potential) Drupal 8 logo, introduced at Drupalcon

While attending Drupalcon I didn’t expect to find much related to Acton’s message.  However, I was surprised to find a lot of what you might call ethical questions discussed throughout the conference.  Web developers attended sessions seeking the right way to approach problems people have building websites.  One session included a panel consisting of the Lullabot team speaking openly about what standard Drupal development rates are.  All of the sessions at Drupalcon were aimed at empowering developers to do things the right way and to improve the way the web is presented.

There is a healthy competitive market in the Drupal community.  Many vendors promoted their web hosting and development services on the exhibit floor.  The biggest sponsors had session rooms named after them and their logos were posted everywhere around the conference.   Because Drupal is open source, there are few barriers for new development shops to use it which increases competition.  Seasoned firms compete for the business of high profile clients that receive millions of web visits a month.

There is a competitive ecosystem in not only the Drupal community, but in the open source web development community overall.  By making the tools used to create the web free, more technical people are created who can fulfill the needs of organizations willing to pay for services.  And a lot of thriving for-profit businesses are formed within this ecosystem.

If you’re interested in the Drupalcon keynotes they are available online.

Now is a great time to check out Acton’s first documentary, The Call of the Entrepreneur.

Call of the Entrepreneur's new design.

The website has been completely redesigned to be more user friendly and attractive.  You will find links to social media for Call of the Entrepreneur as well as options to share the documentary with your friends at the bottom of the site.  We’ve also added the high definition trailer to the site.  The only trailer available on the previous website was very low quality and did not do justice to the film.

The site uses the latest version of the Drupal Content Management System (CMS) that was released in January.  Drupal runs some of the biggest sites in the world; examples of its power can be found on their official website.  Even The White House itself is using Drupal.  One of the major advantages of Drupal 7 (the latest release) is greater search engine exposure due to its advanced content classification.  This means Call of the Entrepreneur will be more visible to everyone looking for inspirational entrepreneurship stories.

Acton Media is also hard at work on their new poverty initiative.  While you’re waiting for more, giving Call of the Entrepreneur a second (or first) look is a great way to satisfy your appetite for great stories.  Click here to visit the new site.  If you’d like to give us feedback you can go to the Call of the Entrepreneur contact page or leave a comment here.

On Feb. 17, Rev. Robert Sirico was a guest on EWTN’s World Over program hosted by Raymond Arroyo. Rev. Sirico, president and co-founder of the Acton Institute, discussed the morality of federal budget making, social networking and the Catholic Church, and Live Acton vs. Planned Parenthood.

Rev. Sirico’s two segments begin at the 10:30 and 37:16 marks.

Arroyo is also joined by guests Rep. Chris Smith and Dr. Andrew Abela.

Following up on this week’s musings related to the local church, I’ve posted some thoughts on the idea of “The Church as Social Network” over at Mere Comments.