Riots and the broken window fallacy

The cost of the nine days of rioting following George Floyd’s death has already exceeded $100 million. Yet some economists believe that damage actually benefits our country. In the epicenter of the riots, Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey has appealed to the federal and state governments to foot the bill for the destruction, which stands at a preliminary estimate of $55 million. Continue Reading...

“Minneapolice” state creates its own monster

In a May 30 article I published for the Italian media outlet Nouva Bussola Quotidiana, “Minneapolice”, repression and anger behind the violence, I explain that plenty of kindling was laid during American COVID-19 lockdowns for heated unrest that has erupted nationwide following George Floyd’s killing.  Continue Reading...

Profitable Vatican museums postpone opening during phase 2

In an article I published today in Catholic World Report, “The profitable Vatican Museums remain closed, look toward a June opening,” I posed some tough questions to Rev. Kevin Likey, a priest of the Legionaries of Christ from Flint, Michigan, who is currently serving as the director of the Vatican Museums Patrons’ Office. Continue Reading...

The 1619 Projection: 3 lies Pulitzer should not reward

The 1619 Project’s introductory essay, written by Nikole Hannah-Jones, won the Pulitzer Prize for commentary—and, notably, not for history or public service. That distinction is illuminating. The 1619 Project makes unfounded assertions about the role of slavery in American political and economic history, and it inverts reality to portray slave owners as the embodiment of free-market principles. Continue Reading...

The great price of America’s great lockdown

One reason why economists are viewed as modern-day Cassandras is that they tell us many things we don’t want to hear. Economics points relentlessly to the costs and benefits associated with particular decisions about alternative uses of scarce resources. Continue Reading...

Innovation vs. intervention during the coronavirus crisis

What sort of innovation, rather than government intervention, can come from the current crisis? What sort of long-term changes might we see in medicine and education? Rev. Robert Sirico, president and co-founder of the Acton Institute, shares his views on what may come. Be sure to check out the other videos in this series, linked below. Continue Reading...