Acton Institute Powerblog Archives

Post Tagged 'ethics'

Defining an Ethical Economy

Longtime Acton friend John H. Armstrong notes the recent discussion of Rowan Williams’ pronouncements on ethics and the economy here at the PowerBlog, commenting that “The archbishop of Canterbury is an extremely likable Christian gentleman, a first-class Christian scholar. Continue Reading...

Oaths, Lies and Social Responsibility

The other day I was tracking down a quotation I heard repeated at a local gathering and came across an interesting book published in 1834. On the title page of the “Googled” Oaths; Their Origin, Nature and History someone had scribbled “full of information… a superior work.” Continue Reading...

The Redemption of Journalism

In the current issue of The City, a journal published by Houston Baptist University and just arrived in my mailbox, I review a book on the oft-maligned relationship between journalism and religion. Continue Reading...

Acton Commentary: The Problem with “Business Ethics”

Samuel Gregg, director of research at the Acton Institute, reflects on business ethics in his recent commentary.  Gregg explores the presence of business ethics courses in business schools; however, with the large presence of business ethics courses we still have a lack of ethics present in business.  Continue Reading...

Developing the Ius Digitus

The ius gentium, or law of nations, has an important place in legal history. Variously conceived, the law of nations often referred to the code of conduct for dealing with foreign peoples according to their own local, national, or regional standards. Continue Reading...

Benedict Reflects on Caritas in Veritate

Joan Lewis, EWTN’s Rome bureau chief, covered Pope Benedict XVI’s general audience address on Wednesday, July 8 , during which the pontiff publicly commented on his landmark social encyclical “Caritas in Veritate” the day after it was officially released by the Vatican. Continue Reading...

Acton Commentary: The State of the Fourth Estate

In today’s Acton Commentary, “The State of the Fourth Estate,” I argue that the profession of journalism must be separable from traditional print media. My alma mater’s flagship student publication, The State News, where I broke into the ranks of op-ed columnists, celebrated its centennial anniversary earlier this month. Continue Reading...

Toward a theological ethic for internet discourse

The relationship of the Christian church and the broader culture has been a perennial question whose genesis antedates the life of the early Church. In his Apology, the church father Tertullian defended Christians as citizens of the Roman empire in the truest and best sense. Continue Reading...